Social Security & Medicare (FICA) taxes

Social Security tax update: How high can it go?

Employees, self-employed individuals and employers all pay Social Security tax, and the amounts can get bigger every year. And yet, many people don’t fully understand the Social Security tax they pay. If you’re an employee If you’re an employee, your wages are hit with the 12.4% Social Security tax up to the annual wage ceiling. […]

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2024 Q2 tax calendar: Key deadlines for businesses and employers

Here are some of the key tax-related deadlines that apply to businesses and other employers during the second quarter of 2024. Keep in mind that this list isn’t all-inclusive, so there may be additional deadlines that apply to you. Contact us to ensure you’re meeting all applicable deadlines and to learn more about the filing

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The “nanny tax” must be paid for nannies and other household workers

You may have heard of the “nanny tax.” But if you don’t employ a nanny, you may think it doesn’t apply to you. Check again. Hiring a housekeeper, gardener or other household employee (who isn’t an independent contractor) may make you liable for federal income and other taxes. You may also have state tax obligations.

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The Social Security wage base for employees and self-employed people is increasing in 2024

The Social Security Administration recently announced that the wage base for computing Social Security tax will increase to $168,600 for 2024 (up from $160,200 for 2023). Wages and self-employment income above this threshold aren’t subject to Social Security tax. Basic details. The Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) imposes two taxes on employers, employees, and self-employed

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Spouse-run businesses face special tax issues

Do you and your spouse together operate a profitable unincorporated small business? If so, you face some challenging tax issues. The partnership issue. An unincorporated business with your spouse is classified as a partnership for federal income tax purposes unless you can avoid that treatment. Otherwise, you must file an annual partnership return, on Form

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The tax advantages of hiring your child this summer

Summer is around the corner so you may be thinking about hiring young people at your small business. At the same time, you may have children looking to earn extra spending money. You can save family income and payroll taxes by putting your child on the payroll. It’s a win-win! Here are four tax advantages.

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You may be liable for “nanny tax” for all types of domestic workers

You’ve probably heard of the “nanny tax.” But even if you don’t employ a nanny, it may apply to you. Hiring a house cleaner, gardener or other household employees (who isn’t an independent contractor) may make you liable for federal income and other taxes. You may also have state tax obligations. If you employ a

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Employers: In 2023, the Social Security wage base is going up

The Social Security Administration recently announced that the wage base for computing Social Security tax will increase to $160,200 for 2023 (up from $147,000 for 2022). Wages and self-employment income above this threshold aren’t subject to Social Security tax. Basics about Social Security The Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) imposes two taxes on employers, employees

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How disability income benefits are taxed

If you’ve recently begun receiving disability income, you may wonder how it’s taxed. The answer is: It depends. The key issue is: Who paid for the benefit? If the income is paid directly to you by your employer, it’s taxable to you just as your ordinary salary would be. (Taxable benefits are also subject to

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Help when needed: Apply the research credit against payroll taxes

Here’s an interesting option if your small company or start-up business is planning to claim the research tax credit. Subject to limits, you can elect to apply all or some of any research tax credits that you earn against your payroll taxes instead of your income tax. This payroll tax election may influence some businesses

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